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Dragon Alliance NFX ski goggles review: a panoramic lens for widescreen views

The Dragon Alliance NFX will have you covered for most conditions, with an oversized lens that offers great range of view for skiers with larger faces

Dragon Alliance NFX Ebony Spyder
(Image: © Dragon Alliance)

Our Verdict

Think bigger is better? You’ll love the NFX’s wide field of vision and comfortable wide fit. The Ebony Spyder incarnation of this popular Dragon Alliance goggle comes with a great go-anywhere lens pairing.

For

  • Wide field of vision
  • Two good lenses included
  • Comfortable foam lining

Against

  • Won’t suit small faces

Dragon Alliance NFX: first impressions

Dragon Alliance NFX

We prefer the Ebony Spyder incarnation of the Dragon Alliance NFX but there are a number of variations, including the Alex Hall Spyder collab (above left) and the Eric Haze Spyder collab (above right) each with two sets of lenses (Image credit: Dragon Alliance)

Just by looking at the Dragon Alliance NFX’s oversized, frameless cylindrical lens you can tell that it’s going to be easy on the eye… literally. It offers a great wide field of vision. 

This is a large goggle, mind – anyone with a smaller facial structure should try out the smaller and scaled-down NFXs instead (see also: How to choose ski goggles for optimal visibility and protection).

There are lots of incarnations of the NFX available but we recommend the Ebony Spyder because we rate the two included lenses that Dragon Alliance have plumped for here: the 23% VLT is perfect for bright conditions, and the Light Rose 66% VLT works well to help you see your way in low light, snowfall for both, so you should be covered from first to last lift. 

Further lenses are available if you want to add to your collection.

But how did they fare under test conditions for our best ski goggles buying guide? Read on…

Specifications

RRP: $156 (US) / £115 (UK)
• Frame colors: Black
• Lens colors: Multiple
• Lens: 23% VLT
• Sizes: Large
• Compatibility: A solid two-lens system for skiers and boarders with larger faces

Dragon Alliance NFX: on the mountains

Vents and an anti-fog coating keep the lenses clear even if you’re working up a sweat on the slopes (you can find further preventative advice in How to stop ski goggles from fogging), and a generous amount of foam feels comfortable against the face and helps the goggles fit nicely under a helmet.

Some interchangeable lenses are fiddlier than others; the NFX sits somewhere in the middle. Two catches for swapping lenses are simple to use, but do require stopping and shedding gloves if you’re mid-ski. If you want a truly fuss-free system, consider a magnetic lens design instead. Need something that fits over glasses? Try out the Dragon Alliance RVX (opens in new tab) instead. 

An award-winning travel and outdoors journalist, presenter and blogger, Sian regularly writes for The Independent, Evening Standard, BBC Countryfile, Coast, Outdoor Enthusiast and Sunday Times Travel. Life as a hiking, camping, wild-swimming adventure-writer has taken her around the world, exploring Bolivian jungles, kayaking in Greenland, diving with turtles in Australia, climbing mountains in Africa and, in Thailand, learning the hard way that peeing on a jellyfish sting doesn’t help. Her blog, thegirloutdoors.co.uk, champions accessible adventures.