Skip to main content

What to do if you see a coyote while hiking

A coyote on a forest trail
The common coyote, which can be found all across North America, is an animal that requires a little knowledge and caution (Image credit: Harry Collins / EyeEm)

Wildlife sightings are unquestionably a big part of the appeal of hiking, but while some animals like the bald eagle inspire excitement, others can instill fear and trepidation. Some of this fear is reasonable, such as if you meet a mountain lion, but usually some outdoor education is all you need to stay safe on the trail. So what do you do if you see a coyote while hiking? 

The common coyote, which can be found all across North America, is an animal that requires a little knowledge and caution. Knowing what to do if you see a coyote while hiking can allow you to preserve your sense of curiosity and adventure when it comes to getting out in your hiking boots on the trail, while ensuring you stay safe and respect nature.

What is a coyote? 

A coyote howling

Coyotes are nocturnal and as such are rarely seen, though you may hear their high pitched yipping if you’ve pitched your tent in an area where coyotes are present (Image credit: Steven G. Smith / EyeEm)

A coyote is a member of the canine species that is native to North America. Though it is a close relative to the wolf, it is much smaller – males coyotes weigh up to 44lbs and their average length is 37 inches. In comparison, a grey wolf can weigh up to 170lbs and on average are over five feet long. Coyotes look just like a grey/brown dog with a long tail and from a distance, you might mistake them for someone’s pet.

Coyotes were originally native to the prairie and deserts, but as a very adaptable species, they now exist in forested areas, mountains and even urban areas. These shrewd animals live in packs, either with their own family or other unrelated coyotes. Coyotes are carnivorous, mostly feeding on deer, small mammals like rodents, birds and reptiles in desert areas – and yes, in the Southwest and Mexico where they coexist, they will indeed chase and feed on the fast-running ground cuckoo known as the Roadrunner.

Coyotes are nocturnal and as such are rarely seen, though you may hear their high pitched yipping if you’ve pitched your tent in an area where coyotes are present. 

Will a coyote attack you? 

A coyote hunting

According to the Humane Society, you’re more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than you are to be bitten by a coyote (Image credit: By Preston Hone)

Coyote attacks on humans are very rare. In fact, according to the Humane Society, you’re more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than you are to be bitten by a coyote and there has only been one recorded incidence of a human being killed by a coyote in the US. Similar to bobcats, a coyote that attacks a human is most often found to be suffering from rabies. 

Like most wildlife, a coyote will typically exit the area upon detecting human presence. However, they do become habituated to humans and may be attracted by food. Where coyotes can really pose a problem is if you’re hiking with your dog, as your pets do make attractive prey for coyotes.

What to do if you encounter a coyote on the trail 

A coyote in the desert

First things first, seeing a coyote on the trail is not necessarily a problem, even if it’s during the day (Image credit: Pierre Longnus)

1. Avoid them 

First things first, seeing a coyote on the trail is not necessarily a problem, even if it’s during the day. They live here after all. If you do spot one, give it plenty of space. Take a different route if you need to, and avoid cornering a coyote that isn’t moving out of your way as it may be protecting its den. 

2. Don’t feed them 

Because they’re so visually similar to our beloved dogs, it can be tempting to want to feed a coyote. Do not feed coyotes – this will make them more comfortable with humans and more likely to approach others in the future, and this is the most common cause of coyote bites. 

3.  Secure pets and children 

As soon as you see or hear a coyote, get your dog on a leash and keep it close. Small children may also want to approach and pet the coyote so keep them close to you at all times. 

4. Don’t run 

Coyotes can run up to 40mph so you’re not going to be able to outrun it, while trying to do so may trigger a chase response. Keep facing the coyote if you come face to face with one, make eye contact, make noise and wave your arms or hiking poles to scare it off. If it doesn’t move, back away slowly and calmly.

Be sure to also read our articles on what to do if you meet a wild boar or a moose while hiking.

Julia Clarke

Julia Clarke is a staff writer for Adventure.com. She is an author, mountain enthusiast and yoga teacher who loves heading uphill on foot, ski, bike and belay. She recently returned to her hometown of Glasgow, Scotland after 20 years living in the USA, 11 of which were spent in the rocky mountains of Vail, Colorado where she owned a boutique yoga studio and explored the west's famous peaks and rivers. She is a champion for enjoying the outdoors sustainably as well as maintaining balance through rest and meditation, which she explores in her book Restorative Yoga for Beginners, a beginner's path to healing with deep relaxation. She enjoys writing about the outdoors, yoga, wellness and travel. In her previous lives, she has also been a radio presenter, music promoter, university teacher and winemaker.