How to carry your phone while running

A woman looks at her fitness tracker
There are plenty of good reasons to carry your phone when you go for a run as well, from personal safety to gathering all the data your fitness tracker app can provide (Image credit: Getty Images)

Want to know how to carry your phone while running? You’ll get no judgement from us. While we know there are plenty of purists out there who hit the trail explicitly to get away from screens and notifications, there are plenty of good reasons to carry your phone when you go for a run as well, from running safety to gathering all the data your fitness tracker app can provide. The only problem is that if you don’t secure your phone properly, it can get wet, bounce around annoyingly in a pocket, or end up smashed on the pavement. 

Whether you want your kids to be able to reach you in an emergency or you just love rocking out to some great tunes in your best trail running shoes, we’re here to help you find the best solution to carrying your phone on a run to keep it out of harm’s way, and easily within reach for when you need to turn the volume up. 

Female runner checks phone in armband

We’re here to help you find the best solution to carrying your phone on a run to keep it out of harm’s way, but easily within reach (Image credit: Betsie Van Der Meer)

1. Running vest 

The most comfortable and versatile approach is to carry your phone in your running vest. If you’re already running long enough distances that you’re wearing the best hydration pack, this is the obvious spot for your phone, but even if you’re not carrying water, you might want to consider a vest. These lightweight pieces of gear don’t restrict your movement at all and no matter how minimalist your vest is, there are always handy chest pockets big enough for keeping a phone within easy reach when you’re on the move – use a zipped pocket if available. This is the best approach for safeguarding your phone against wet weather and it means you can easily stash your keys and best waterproof jacket, too. 

Woman trail running with hydration pack

These lightweight pieces of gear don’t restrict your movement at all (Image credit: Getty)

2. Armband 

A more old school and minimalist approach is the classic running armband, which fits around your bicep. Some people find the arm band slips down if it’s not secured correctly, and it can be a bit annoying if you’re using wired earphones because your arm pumping up and down keeps pulling on the cord. It doesn't offer as much protection from the rain either, but many runners love this method for its simplicity. 

London runner with phone in armband

A more old school and minimalist approach is the classic running armband, which fits around your bicep (Image credit: Ales-A)

3. Running belt 

Next, there’s the running belt, which fastens around your waist and has pockets for your phone, keys and even your best water bottle. These are definitely an acquired taste, as some people find that they bounce around or even affect your gait, but other runners swear by them. 

Woman running in the streets and checking her pace on her smart watch

Running belts are definitely an acquired taste, as some people find that they bounce around or even affect your gait (Image credit: FreshSplash)

4. Pocket 

Finally, you can just put your phone in your pocket, but not just any pocket will do. The zipped pocket of a snug fitting running jacket can work, but in a looser jacket it will bounce around. If you’re wearing a pair of the best running leggings, the thigh pocket can work really well. However, your phone might get a bit sweaty here and won’t get as much rain protection. 

Julia Clarke is a staff writer for Advnture.com and the author of the book Restorative Yoga for Beginners. She loves to explore mountains on foot, bike, skis and belay and then recover on the the yoga mat. Julia graduated with a degree in journalism in 2004 and spent eight years working as a radio presenter in Kansas City, Vermont, Boston and New York City before discovering the joys of the Rocky Mountains. She then detoured west to Colorado and enjoyed 11 years teaching yoga in Vail before returning to her hometown of Glasgow, Scotland in 2020 to focus on family and writing.