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Missing backpacker rescued a week after disappearing in Olympic National Park

The mountains of Olympic National Park in the backdrop with pine tree forests at the foreground
26 year-old Jerren Fisher was airlifted to safety from a ravine in Olympic National Park and is said to be in stable condition (Image credit: Diana Robinson Photography)

A backpacker who went missing a week ago in Washington’s Olympic National Park has been safely recovered and is recuperating in hospital.

National Park Service search and rescue teams made contact with 26-year-old Jerren Fisher on Sunday afternoon and several hours later a helicopter crew hoisted him to safety from Seven Stream Drainage. Fisher is reported to be in stable condition while the Coast Guard even reported him to be in “good spirits.”

According to the National Parks Service, Fisher had a four-night wilderness permit beginning September 8. He set off with his backpack that day and was planning on camping at Enchanted Valley, Marmot Lake, Camp Pleasant, and Sundown Lake. He was reported overdue by a family member on September 16, however the initial search was hampered by weather conditions. 

A rescue helicopter hovers above stranded hikers on a mountain

National Park Service search and rescue teams made contact with 26 year-old Jerren Fisher on Sunday afternoon and several hours later a helicopter crew hoisted him to safety from Seven Stream Drainage (Image credit: Hans Neleman)

The Coast Guard reported that Fisher was well-prepared for the situation he found himself in. After making contact and establishing Fisher’s location, he reportedly used his flashlight to help guide the rescue teams, who found him with a few scrapes and bruises, and some remaining reserves of food and water. He was flown to nearby Olympia Regional Airport for medical attention.

In a press release, the National Parks Service urged visitors to plan ahead, pack the hiking essentials and have an emergency plan. Hiking in the park is a popular activity through the fall and visitors are reminded to be prepared for changing weather conditions that can also affect rescue efforts.  

Julia Clarke is a staff writer for Advnture.com and the author of the book Restorative Yoga for Beginners. She loves to explore mountains on foot, bike, skis and belay and then recover on the the yoga mat. Julia graduated with a degree in journalism in 2004 and spent eight years working as a radio presenter in Kansas City, Vermont, Boston and New York City before discovering the joys of the Rocky Mountains. She then detoured west to Colorado and enjoyed 11 years teaching yoga in Vail before returning to her hometown of Glasgow, Scotland in 2020 to focus on family and writing.