Skip to main content

Hario V60 Plastic Coffee Dripper review: a simple, lightweight pour over for backpacking, car camping and home use

This classic pour over is a lightweight version of the one used by baristas around the world making it a convenient option for backpacking as well as car camping

Hario V60
(Image: © Hario)

Our Verdict

If you’re looking for a reliable coffee maker you can take backpacking, the Hario V60 takes a little practice, but will brew a great cup of coffee and fit in your pack

For

  • Lightweight
  • Makes great coffee, with practice
  • Works with any size of mug
  • Affordable

Against

  • Takes some practice to perfect
  • Requires special paper filters

Hario V60 Plastic Coffee Dripper: first impressions

Hario’s V60 coffee dripper is the preferred pour over used by baristas around the world due it’s reliably great coffee, and the plastic version is light enough that you can reasonably take it backpacking as well as car camping. The concept is simple: place the dripper on top of your coffee mug, line it with a paper filter, add coffee and pour hot water in a spiral motion.

If you’re not a barista, chances are you’ll need a few dress rehearsals to perfect your coffee-to-water ratio as well as your technique, but the dripper on this camping coffee maker comes with a manual and Hario provides some instructional content on their website too. This dripper fits on any size of mug and makes one cup of coffee, but it comes in bigger models for when you’re brewing for a whole crew.

This dripper can easily be stashed in your backpack, and while it does require specialized paper filters, it’s an extremely low cost and convenient solution to enjoying good coffee at camp.

Specifications

• RRP: $8.50 (US) / £6.50 (UK)
• Weight: 2.95oz / 83.6g
Materials: Plastic
• Brew capacity: 1 cup
• Dimensions: 4 in x 3.5 in
• Best use: Backpacking, car camping, glamping, travel

Hario V60 Plastic Coffee Dripper: round the campfire

Hario V60

Hario’s V60 coffee dripper is the preferred pour over used by baristas around the world due it’s reliably great coffee (Image credit: Hario)

I’ve long admired baristas who can get the perfect pour over coffee using a Hario V60 and now that I've tried it, I can attest that it takes a little practice but it’s worth the effort. My first attempt definitely produced some very watery coffee but thanks to Hario’s helpful guidance, I was able to up the coffee and work on my pouring technique and now I can understand why it’s such an iconic model as the coffee is consistently great.

This dripper is really the only camping coffee maker I’d seriously consider taking backpacking as it’s so light. I was able to put in my pack and fill it with my spare hiking socks so it really didn’t take up any room. It works best if you’re pouring water from a smaller camping pot, otherwise you might want to bring a small camping kettle or some kind of jug with a spout. The hard plastic is sturdy enough that it can take a little knocking about on the trail and it works with all of my camping mugs. Also, cleaning up is easy since you just bin the filter with the coffee in it and give the dripper a quick rinse.

It’s an extremely affordable option, though of course, you need the specialized paper filters which will add to the cost over time, but it’s hugely convenient for both travel and home use.

Here’s how it performed:

Coffee

Great drip coffee once you get the knack for it.

Ease of use

Super simple – add coffee, pour hot water in a spiral motion, wait, pour some more, sip.

Durability

The hard plastic is really durable.

Portability

Light as a feather and easily packable.

Capacity

It brews one cup of coffee at a time, but with no need to let it cool between turns, you can easily be making the second cup while you sip the first.

Value 

Very affordable, but you also need to purchase coffee filters that are the right shape and size. These come in packs of 100 for about the same price as the dripper, so the value will go down over the years.

Julia Clarke is a staff writer for Advnture.com and the author of the book Restorative Yoga for Beginners. She loves to explore mountains on foot, bike, skis and belay and then recover on the the yoga mat. Julia graduated with a degree in journalism in 2004 and spent eight years working as a radio presenter in Kansas City, Vermont, Boston and New York City before discovering the joys of the Rocky Mountains. She then detoured west to Colorado and enjoyed 11 years teaching yoga in Vail before returning to her hometown of Glasgow, Scotland in 2020 to focus on family and writing.