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Karpos Moved Evo Jersey with Polartec running top review: a near-perfect performer in warmer weather

The lightweight Karpos Moved Evo Jersey is mesh-design, fair-weather running T for tearing up the trails

Karpos Moved Evo Jersey with Polartec
(Image: © Karpos)

Our Verdict

A high-performing, light-weight, fair-weather running top that breathes beautifully, wicks wonderfully, dries rapidly and doesn’t stink, even after multiple adventures.

For

  • Excellent breathability
  • Superb moisture wicking
  • Body hugging design

Against

  • Very little thermal protection
  • No wind protection
  • Expensive

Karpos Moved Evo Jersey: first impressions 

This collaborative product, made by Italian brand Karpos with Polartec Delta as the main component, is comprised almost entirely of a technical mesh material, which means it breaths like an absolute dream when you’re working up a sweat on the trails, and wicks moisture away from the skin like a champion. However, it can leave you shivering somewhat if you get caught out in less warm or more windy conditions. But this is exactly how it’s been designed, and so long as you’re aware of this and wear it in appropriate scenarios, it rates alongside the best running tops out there.

It’s a real body-hugger this one, which most faster runners will appreciate. There’s plenty of dynamic movement across the garment, but it can ride up a little bit under other layers or hydration packs. The fabric has been treated with Polygiene to reduce the accumulation of pong. We wore this top on sweaty runs all last summer, and can happily report that it remains relatively stink free. 

Specifications

• RRP: £65 (UK)
• Style: Short-sleeved T
• Weight: 112g / 4oz
• Sizes: S-3XL
• Materials: Polartec Delta (synthetic)
• Colors: Outer Space & Tangerine / Pond & Sulphur / Outer Space & Black / Flame Scarlet & Ombre Blue / Ombre Blue & Jasmine Green
• Compatibility: Trail or road running in relatively warm conditions 

Karpos Moved Evo Jersey: on the trails 

Karpos Moved Evo Jersey with Polartec

The fabric helps maintain a constant body temperature even during intense heat (Image credit: Karpos)

I’ve been running in this top for over eight months now, on trails and road, in race conditions and across all sorts of distances, and while it not be completely daisy-fragranced around the pits, I can confirm that the Polygiene (opens in new tab) treatment employed to stop the buildup of bacteria and nose-wrinkling stink does indeed work. And that’s with the top often having sat at the bottom of an outdoor laundry basket for several days after a run – which makes it extra impressive.

This is firmly a top for people who run hot, or who are regularly running in hot weather – the amount of techy mesh in the design means it breaths beautifully, but does let plenty of chilly wind in. If you’re prone to shivering, then wear a shell on the start line of any event where you’re wearing this top, then jettison the shell just before you start.

The top clings tight to your torso, which some runners will appreciate more than others – it’s just something to be aware of (if you prefer running in baggier tops, this isn’t for you). 

I found it performed best on shorter runs, when I didn’t need to take a pack, as the material bunches up a bit beneath hydropacks and so on. 

In the right conditions – on fair-weather days from late spring through to early fall – this top is a pleasure to run around in. And, if you do get caught out in a shower, or build up a serious sweat (hard in such a breathable top), the mesh material dries extremely fast.

Writer, editor and enthusiast of anything involving boots, bikes, boats, beers and bruises, Pat has spent 20 years pursuing adventure stories. En route he’s canoed Canada’s Yukon River, climbed Mont Blanc and Kilimanjaro, skied and mountain biked through the Norwegian Alps, run an ultra across the roof of Mauritius, and set short-lived records for trail-running Australia’s highest peaks and New Zealand’s Great Walks. He’s authored walking guides to Devon (opens in new tab) and Dorset (opens in new tab), and once wrote a whole book about Toilets (opens in new tab) for Lonely Planet. Follow Pat’s escapades here (opens in new tab).