Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket review: a puffer and outer shell combo

A versatile weatherproof jacket, the Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket can be worn in three different ways according to the conditions when you’re walking

Man wearing Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket
(Image: © Pat KInsella)

Advnture Verdict

If you just want one jacket, which offers you a choice of three different setups according to the conditions you face on any given day, then the Journey is worth considering. It can be a warm micropuffer, a waterproof outer shell or a full winter coat providing mid and outer layer protection against the elements.

Pros

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    Very warm

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    Can be worn in three different configurations

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    Made from recycled materials

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    Modular design keeps kit organized

Cons

  • -

    Waterproof and breathability rating not as high as many others

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    No inner pockets

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    No women’s version

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    Bulky

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    Limited colors

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Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket: first impressions

Coming from a brand known for its more affordable outdoor kit, the Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket comes with slightly steeper price tag than you might expect. However, as the name makes pretty clear, you do in fact get three garments for the price of one with this modular wild-weather jacket, which makes it good value and very versatile.

Specifications

• List Price: £219.99 (UK) / $175 (US)
• Gender specification: Men’s
• Sizes: XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL
• Waterproof rating: HH 2,000mm
• Breathability rating: 2,000g /m2/24hrs
• Materials: Recycled polyester
• Colors: Black
• Compatibility: A very protective and cozy jacket on cold and rainy days

Impressively made almost entirely from recycled materials, the coat comprises a quilted padded inner jacket and a waterproof outer shell. The two garments can be worn completely separately, one without the other, or collectively as one integrated jacket. 

The filling in the padded inner is made with microfibers, a synthetic vegan-friendly alternative to down, and the lining fabrics are also reasonably breathable. 

The outer layer has a decent storm hood, which can be pulled in around your face, and the hem and sleeves are also adjustable. With a hydrostatic head rating of 2,000, this shell layer is not as stormproof as many of the jackets found in our buying guide to the best waterproof coats and rain jackets, but it can still cope with most downpours, and the inner is also water resistant.

Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket: in the field

Man wearing Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket

The Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket comprises both a quilted inner jack and an outer shell, and each can be worn separately as well (Image credit: Pat Kinsella)

I tested the Journey jacket during a wide variety of outings, ranging from the mid-winter walks in the wilderness of mid Devon through to chilly coastal adventures along sections of the South West Coast Path, as well as wearing it for everyday reasons such as taking the dog out for walks in the woods. 

The modular design of this coat effectively comprises two parts of the layering system, the mid and outer layers, and I found that, so long as I popped on a good base layer, the Journey jacket did its job, even in the coldest conditions.

Cuffs of the Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket

If you want to combine the two jackets into one, there are additional attachment poppers at the cuffs and on the back of neck to keep things secure (Image credit: Pat Kinsella)

Midwinter, unsurprisingly, I used both sections of the jackets together, which enabled me to stay both warm and dry. When you do choose to combine them, the two jackets zip together to form one coat, with additional attachment poppers at the cuffs and on the back of neck, to which is handy when you reach your destination and want to keep your kit organized and easy to find.

As we segued out of the coldest months and into springtime, however, I regularly wore either the quilted inner on its own, which supplied enough insulation to keep my torso toasty, or opted just for the shell layer, when conditions were more wet and windy.

Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket

The Mountain Warehouse Journey Men’s Recycled 3-in-1 Waterproof Jacket offers some generously proportioned pockets (Image credit: Pat Kinsella)

In terms of other features, there are two chest pockets with Velcro closures on the outer, as well as a pair of zipped hand pockets – all generously proportioned. There are no inner pockets, however, no doubt because of the design of the jacket.

There are warmer and better-designed mid layers out there, and more waterproof shells, but as a modular design this coat offers a degree of versatility for people who just want to own one coat. Personally I would lean more towards buying two separate garments, but it can be cheaper to pick up a combination jacket such as this. Full price it isn’t cheap, but the Journey jacket can be found heavily discounted as we move into the shoulder seasons, and it’s well made so it should see you through many more cold months in years to come.

Pat Kinsella

Author of Caving, Canyoning, Coasteering…, a recently released book about all kinds of outdoor adventures around Britain, Pat has spent 20 years pursuing stories involving boots, bikes, boats, beers and bruises. En route he’s canoed Canada’s Yukon River, climbed Mont Blanc and Kilimanjaro, skied and mountain biked through the Norwegian Alps, run an ultra across the roof of Mauritius, and set short-lived records for trail-running Australia’s highest peaks and New Zealand’s Great Walks. He’s authored walking guides to Devon and Dorset, and once wrote a whole book about Toilets for Lonely Planet. Follow Pat’s escapades on Strava here and instagram here.