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Best one-person tents 2022: solo shelters for lightweight camping trips

best one-person tent: Snowdonia wild camp
Solo wild camping adventures are good for the soul (Image credit: Matthew Jones)

The best one-person tents are the keys to the doors of all manner of wonderful adventures in the wild. These minimalist shelters are lightweight, packable and artfully crafted, enabling you to experience magical solo expeditions or wild camping missions with backpacking friends.

Tent technology continues to advance at a rapid pace. In our roundup, featherlight poles and lightweight, weather-resistant fabrics combine with ingenuous designs to create tiny but mighty shelters that protect you from the elements, while packing down small for your backpack. 

The best camping tent for you is the one you feel most comfortable with during your adventures. With this in mind, it's worth considering that many wild campers choose a 2-person tent for their solo expeditions, valuing the extra space to the extent that it negates downside of extra grams on the trail.

However, for adventure races and fastpacking missions, the best one-person tent options are perfect. The only lighter approaches are with a bivvy bag or a hammock, which aren't ideal for questionable weather conditions. Here we've grouped the best one-person tent options available today into ultralight models, shelters for year-round use, tents that effectively repel inclement weather and options that we think represent great value.

Best ultralight one-person tents

Nemo Hornet one-person tent

(Image credit: Nemo)

Nemo Hornet

Versatile, ultra-light, easy to pitch and bombproof

Specifications

RRP: $330 (US) / £285 (UK)
Packed weight: 905g/2lb
Pack size: 50 x 12cm/19.5 x 4.5in
Dimensions: 222 x 108 x 79cm / 87 x 43 x 31in
Compatibility: 3-season all rounder

Reasons to buy

+
Semi-freestanding
+
Simple clip-in pole and tension design
+
Tougher than it appears
+
Good ventilation

Reasons to avoid

-
Can be breezy in cold winds
-
Limited vestibule room for backpack
-
Heavy pegs

Nemo has established itself as a reliable go-to brand for producing high-quality, lightweight tents for hiking and mountain missions, enough to have earned a handy reputation (and several awards) for design innovation. Its Hornet model comes as a one-person and a two-person, offering some upgrade flexibility. With only approximately 150g difference between models, you may still want to choose the two-person even for sleep-alone missions, delivering more space for gear. Or just so you can starfish. 

The Hornet offers a well-tuned balance of lightweight, intuitive design matched to a fairly roomy interior (for a one-person offering), especially regarding headroom. Volumising guyouts connect the inner tent to the rainfly, pulling the sidewalls of the inner tent outward to create even more interior space.

The ball-and-socket design makes clipping in the single Y-shape pole super easy for lightning-quick pop up, with an intuitive and non-fiddly assembly, even when you have the cold-hand fumbles. The tension of the Y-shape – two contact points at the head, one at the feet – brings the tent well taught with ultralight but tough pegs tensioning the floor to full capacity. Head room is good for such a small beast.  Overall, this is a cracking tent for going fast and light in three seasons and most weather conditions. 

Six Moon Lunar Solo one-person tent

(Image credit: Six Moon)

Six Moon Lunar Solo

A dynamic floating canopy and floor design with single pole set up and steep walls for keeping out wind and rain

Specifications

RRP: $230 + $76 extras (US) / £240 (UK)
Weight: 740g/1lb 10.1oz not including pole (51g/1.8oz for 124cm/49in carbon fibre) and pegs (71g/2.5oz)
Pack Size: 28 x 11.5cm / 11 x 4.5in
Dimensions: 122 x 229cm / 48 x 90in
Compatibility: 3-season

Reasons to buy

+
Robust
+
Great tent for wind and snow
+
Can be pitched with trekking poles
+
Good ventilation

Reasons to avoid

-
Tricky set up initially
-
Parts (and pegs) sold separately

Garnering a bunch of ‘Editor’s Picks’ and other gear awards, the Lunar Solo backpacking tent is a robust shelter that performs well in extreme conditions, given its distinctive low hexagonal shape and excellent waterproof rating. Short, steeply sloped sides handle snow or high winds with ease but still offer adequate room inside, including a storage vestibule area. Good peak ceiling height in the centre of the tent maximizes sitting room, although the steep wall-spill design means there’s reduced room elsewhere in the tent. Given limited moving parts, set up is extremely quick once you work it out (the brand claims never more than two minutes no matter what the conditions are like). 

Unlike a traditional tent, the Lunar Solo's canopy floats off the ground, allowing for 360-degree  ventilation. The floor is not rigidly fixed, rather designed to float. The brand’s reasoning is that “a floor under tension is more likely to rip or get holes poked in by sharp objects”. The floating tent canopy means you can vary the height (by using a trekking pole) depending on the conditions. Higher delivers more ventilation, whilst you can lower it in stormy weather. 

Robustness in inclement weather is afforded via 3000mm rated 20D Silicone-coated poly for the fly and 40D on the floor. This is a great grassroots design, the catch is that everything seems to be ‘sold separately’: the support pole/s and stakes (you need 6), and even the seam-sealing service needs to be pre-ordered and paid for aside according to the brand website. 

MSR Carbon Reflex 1 one-person tent

(Image credit: MSR)

MSR Carbon Reflex 1

An impressively lightweight shelter, but strictly 3-season

Specifications

RRP: $523 (US) / £440 (UK)
Weight: 660g/1lb 7.3oz, with pegs 790g/1lb 11.9oz
Pack size: 43 x 13cm / 17 x 5.5in
Dimensions: 76 x 213cm/ 30 x 84in / 87 x 43 x 31in
Compatibility: 3-season

Reasons to buy

+
Super lightweight
+
Fast and light fly + floor pad option
+
Reasonably sized vestibule

Reasons to avoid

-
Can be breezy
-
Reduced headroom

This updated double-wall, three-season tent sits at the lightest end of the weight spectrum, but still offers good internal volume. Weight-saving fabrics and brilliant Easton carbon fiber poles have helped shave grams off previous iterations of this model. A zipper-less vestibule entry was worked into the design for the same reason – weight saving – although online commentary hasn’t been favorable to this change, the Velcro proving too finicky and less secure for some.

A fairly roomy interior is comparable to most in this category and while you won’t be swinging cats (nor should you be), it’s comfortable enough for all bar giants. Headroom has been shaved a touch although we’ll only ever be dealing in small degrees between models when it comes to the one-person lightweight brigade. Internal mesh storage pockets allow good interior organisation and the vestibule is a reasonable size vestibule for storing pack and boots.

The 7Denier flysheet fabric is super light and offers 1200mm HH waterproofing but it’s not as life-long tough as other brand models in category. Same deal for the 15D floor, which you can reinforce with a sold-separately footprint (and add weight). A mostly mesh inner gives good ventilation in warmer conditions but also means less heat retained if there is a breeze in cooler environments – it’s a strictly three-season offering. For added versatility on lighter trips, all the Carbon Reflex tents allow for a ‘Fast and Light’ set up option with the optional footprint.

All in all, this tent is up there with the best lightweight camping gear you can buy.

Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1 one-person tent

(Image credit: Terra Nova)

Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1

An extremely lightweight tent for when every gram matters

Specifications

RRP: £999 (UK)
Weight: 0.49kg/1lb 1.28oz
Pack size: 30 x 9cm/11.8 x 3.5in
Dimensions: 220 x 81cm/86.6x31.9in
Compatibility: 3-season lightweight adventures

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely lightweight
+
You can sit up inside the tent
+
Small pack size

Reasons to avoid

-
Not freestanding
-
Very expensive

Terra Nova market the Laser Pulse Ultra 1 as the ‘lightest tent in the world’. At only 450g minimum weight (490g when you pack it as intended) it’s perfect for people who know their bag weight to the nearest 0.1g. Or for people who like bragging about ultralight gear at parties. 

The tent is aimed at the multiday mountain marathon runner - the type of person who wants to keep weight to the absolute minimum, but can suffer a little for the sake of a couple of nights on the hill. The shelter has a tunnel construction, with enough height to allow an adult to sit up inside the pitched tent. A groundsheet protector is available separately. And if you’re worried about wear and tear, Terra Nova offers a guarantee ‘to the original owner against defects in materials and workmanship for the lifetime of the product’.

Best one-person trekking pole tent

Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P one-person tent

(Image credit: Sierra Designs)
An unusual and innovative trekking pole tent that balances weight, packed size and overall liveability

Specifications

RRP: £300 (UK)
Weight: 1.08kg / 3lb 7oz
Pack size: 40 x 16cm / 16 x 6.5in
Length: 259cm / 102in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Good internal length and headroom
+
Useful porch areas
+
Can be pitched inner first, all-in-one or outer first
+
Lightweight, compact packed size

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs careful pitching
-
Inner is not the widest

This unusual tent is a double-walled design, but lacks conventional poles, instead requiring a pair of trekking poles, placed at opposite corners, to form the structure. This asymmetric offset configuration is a bit ungainly looking but very innovative, giving the user significantly more interior headroom than most trekking pole tents. 

The High Route 3,000 is an evolution of the original High Route, with slightly heavier but also more weatherproof fabrics, featuring an upgraded waterproof rating of 3,000mm Hydrostatic Head – hence the name. There’s also more fabric and less mesh in the inner, to add warmth and reduce draughts. All of these changes are designed to appeal to the UK and European markets – US consumers might want to consider the standard High Route instead. 

But for Brits in particular it is a practical and versatile shelter, since you can pitch it outer first, all-in-one or just use the inner as a bug shelter. This gives you plenty of options regardless of prevailing weather conditions. Inside, there is plenty of room to stretch out and sit upright, though the inner isn’t the widest we’ve tested. On the other hand, you get two useful porch areas and ‘one and a half’ doors – the first has a full-length zip for easy entry and exit, while the other has a half zip that gives access to a smaller vestibule area. Sierra Designs calls this a ‘gear garage’, and it is certainly a useful space to stash rucksacks, cooking gear or muddy boots.

Read our full Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P review

Best one-person tents for year-round use

Big Sky Chinook 1Plus one-person tent

(Image credit: Big Sky)

Big Sky Chinook 1Plus

A fabulous 4-season offering, excellent for stormy weather, but heavier than most other solo shelters

Specifications

RRP: $550 (US) / £490 (UK)
Weight: 1.6kg / 3lb 8.4oz
Pack Size: 44 x 13cm/17 x 5.5in
Dimensions: 96 x 230 x 60cm/36 x 91 x 24in
Compatibility: 4-season

Reasons to buy

+
Freestanding
+
Four season
+
Flexibility to squash in a mate in a pinch
+
Storm, wind and snowproof

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy
-
Tricky to set up

The dome-shaped Big Sky Chinook is a hardy four-season shelter, able to withstand properly foul stormy conditions. When operated as a single-unit (fly-clipped-to-tent), it’s great for setting up and packing down in bad weather. It’s also fairly roomy – and able to accommodate two at a stretch. Here’s the catch for those benefits, however: it’s also double the weight of other one-person tents on test. But the space, warmth and a guarantee of staying dry may be worth paying the price of heft, especially if you can split the carrying between two. 

The strength ratio comes from a sturdy three-pole design, which can actually be downscaled to a two-pole set up if you want to find weight savings as solo traveller, but that also drops you into three-season territory. A double-wall construction with two top vents does the job of preventing interior condensation while still holding on to body heat warmth in cold conditions. The steep wall design sheds snow well, so it’s a good winter wonderland tent, and there are many tabs sewn into seams for additional guys. The durable 30D nylon silicone/PU-coated and seam taped fabric floor keeps the footprint dry and 1500mm rated fly sheet keeps things super dry.

Exped Vela I Extreme one-person tent

(Image credit: Exped)

Exped Vela I Extreme

A versatile tent designed for year round use from snow to sunshine

Specifications

RRP: $480 (US) / £450 (UK)
Weight: 1.6–1.9kg/3lb 8.4–4lb 3oz
Pack size: 44 × 12 × 12cm/17.3 x 4.72 x 4.72in
Dimensions: 245 × 112cm/96.45 x 44in
Compatibility: 4-season all rounder

Reasons to buy

+
Large vestibule
+
One side of rainfly can roll back
+
Only requires two pegs

Reasons to avoid

-
Not freestanding

The Exped Vela I Extreme is a tent designed to cope in extreme weather conditions. You can pitch this in snow just as easily as on a balmy summer’s night. Even more incredible is that it only requires one large pole, two tiny end poles and two pegs. That is, of course, without any guy ropes but it’s still pretty impressive. 

It is a tunnel style tent, tensioned from either end, with the added bonus that you can roll back the outer layer for increased ventilation in hot weather. It has a generously proportioned and sheltered vestibule, perfect for keeping your pack dry. 

Like all Exped tents, it has nifty little stuff sacks attached to the guy lines - no need to get your cords in a tangle. The ground sheet is 70D, tougher than many lightweight tents. This is a versatile tent designed for year-round use. 

Best one-person tents for bad weather

Nordisk Svalbard 1 Sl one-person tent

(Image credit: Nordisk)

Nordisk Svalbard 1 Sl

When the storm arrives, you’ll be comforted by this tent’s extreme weather credentials

Specifications

RRP: £290 (UK)
Weight: 1.7kg/3lb 12oz
Pack Size: 45 x 15cm / 17.7 x 5.9in
Dimensions: 275 x 125cm/108 x 49in
Compatibility: 3-season adventures

Reasons to buy

+
Able to withstand a hurricane 
+
Small pack size
+
Tall enough to sit up inside

Reasons to avoid

-
Small vestibule
-
Not freestanding

It is unusual for a tent to have been tested up against measured windspeeds by the manufacturer, but the Nordisk Svalbard 1 has been pitted against just that – and csme out standing. “It surpassed the magic 32.7m/s in our wind tunnel test,” say Nordisk, which basically means it has the “ability to withstand a hurricane”. This is, of course, if pegged correctly! 

This is a three-pole tunnel tent and the inner can be pitched alone, or with the rain fly over it. The webbing is colour coded, making for an easy set up. The pack sack has compression straps, allowing it to be compressed even smaller in your backpack.

Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P one-person tent

(Image credit: Vaude)

Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P

A spacious and sturdy tent to withstand the worst weather

Specifications

RRP: £470 (UK)
Weight: 1.25kg/2lb 12oz
Pack size: 40 x 12 cm/15.75 x 4.7in
Dimensions: 2.3msq
Compatibility: 3-season trekking

Reasons to buy

+
Spacious
+
Easy to pitch
+
High wind stability
+
Eco friendly construction

Reasons to avoid

-
Not 100% freestanding

The Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P tent is a popular choice for bad-weather camping. If you are expecting to be throwing your tent up in the dark, amid horizontal rain, then this might be the tent for you. The Hogan has a very simple two pole ‘tri-pod’ construction that is incredibly simple to pitch and very sturdy against high winds. 

However, it relies on the tent corners being pegged out for maximum space so this is not a completely freestanding tent. You will not be able to use the tent to full capacity on hard or rocky ground. It can either be a spacious one-person tent or a cosy two-person tent, designed specifically for the lightweight market. It has adjustable ventilation and is completely PVC-free, manufactured with the environment in mind.

Best cheap one-person tents for wild camping

Snugpak Ionosphere one-person tent

(Image credit: Snugpak)
Low-profile solo tent that works well for stealthy wild camps

Specifications

RRP: £194 (UK)
Weight: 1.55kg / 3lb 7oz
Pack size: 48cm x 14cm / 19 x 6in
Length: 265cm / 104in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Good interior length and width
+
Stable, wind-shedding design
+
Well-priced

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor headroom
-
No porch or vestibule area

This compact solo shelter from British brand Snugpak is a sort of halfway house between a one-person tent and a hooped bivvy. The low-profile design is very inconspicuous and sheds wind well, making it a practical choice for stealthy wild camps just off the trail or exposed pitches on hill, moor and mountain. The tent is available in two colorways, with an outer fly sheet of either drab olive or a terrain camo pattern, further emphasising its clandestine credentials. The two-pole, double-skinned design pitches inner first and is easy to set up. 

The inner is made of a No-See-Um Mesh that keeps the interior cool and airy, though it’s important to guy out the fly sheet securely so as to avoid the outer skin touching the inner and causing condensation to drip through. On the other hand, the design means that the inner can be used without the fly as a stand-alone bug shelter in warmer, drier climates, which adds versatility. Inside, things are a little cramped in terms of headroom – you’ll need to crawl in on your elbows and don’t expect to be able to sit upright – but the footprint in terms of length and width is exceedingly generous.

There is plenty of room to sort out your kit or stow a rucksack alongside the sleeping space. You could even sleep two in an emergency situation, or perhaps if competing in adventure races or other multi-day mountain challenges. Two mesh pockets provide useful quick-access storage too. The design means there is no porch or vestibule area though, which might be a deal-breaker for some.  

Read our full Snugpak Ionosphere review

Wild Country Coshee Micro V2 one-person tent

(Image credit: Wild Country)

Wild Country Coshee Micro V2

A great starter tent for an affordable first foray into solo camping

Specifications

RRP: £130 (UK)
Weight: 1.4kg/ 3lb 1oz
Pack size: 36 x 14cm/14.2 x 5.5in
Dimensions: 215 x 56cm/84.6 x 22in
Compatibility: 2-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Quick and easy to pitch
+
Low price

Reasons to avoid

-
Small interior
-
Not freestanding
-
Very low profile

Designed and priced to be more accessible to mainstream campers and backpackers, the Wild Country Coshee Micro V2 is an affordable option for people just starting to explore one-person tents. This would be a great place to start if you’re not sure exactly what you want in terms of features. 

It is a small tunnel-type tent, with only two poles. You can’t sit up inside it – unless you’re a very small person – and it’s described as a ‘deluxe bivvy’ by the manufacturer. Porch space is limited, but the full-length door enables you to make the most of what there is. If you’re happy to slide into a small abode at the end of a long day, this is well worth a look.

Best cheap one-person tents for general camping

Robens Arrow Head one-person tent

(Image credit: Robens)
A great value entry-level tent that is robust, stable and protective, if fractionally heavy for a solo shelter

Specifications

RRP: £141 (UK) / €160.95 (EU)
Weight: 1.8kg / 3lb 15oz
Pack Size: 38cm x 15cm / 15 x 6in
Length: 270cm / 106in
Compatibility: : 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Competitively priced
+
Can be pitched outer first or all-in-one
+
Compact packed size

Reasons to avoid

-
 Not the lightest
-
Limited headroom
-
Small porch/vestibule

With a competitive price tag and a small pack size, this robust and stable tent is ideal for backpackers on a budget. The Arrow Head is a side entry, double-wall one-person tunnel tent from Robens’ Route range, which the brand describes as its series of ‘entry-level technical tents’. As that description suggests, it is a value-orientated tent, with a very competitive price point. However, it is well made too, with a robust 75-denier polyester fly sheet and a high-quality aluminium pole set. It pitches outer first or all-in-one, and the fly could even be utilised as a standalone single-skin shelter, so it is also a versatile option. This set-up is particularly good for extended camping in wet weather. 

The packed size is good, but overall this tent is fractionally on the heavy side, especially compared to the lightest solo shelters on the market. On the other hand, the Arrow Head is a far more affordable tent than many of those premium ultralight offerings, and at under 2kg it is still a viable option for backpackers on a budget. The bottom line is, if you want to save grams, you’ll have to spend a bit more. Fortunately, this tent still stows easily in a backpacking rucksack.

Read our full Robens Arrow Head review

Vango F10 Helium UL 1 one-person tent

(Image credit: Vango)

Vango F10 Helium UL 1

A good entry-level tent designed with backpackers in mind

Specifications

RRP: £250 (UK)
Weight: 1.2kg / 2lb 10.3oz
Pack size: 40cm x 13cm/ 15.75 x 5.1in
Dimensions: 210cm / 82.7in long
Compatibility: 2- to 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Simple and quick construction
+
Stuff sack with compression straps
+
Low price

Reasons to avoid

-
Slightly fiddly to thread the main pole in the sleeve
-
Not freestanding

The F10 Helium UL 1 is described by Vango as a tent that ‘won’t hold you back’. They have designed this model with the fast-and-light backpacker or mountaineer in mind, balancing reliability with lightweight materials. The ground sheet is 70D with a ‘bathtub’ construction - that’s an extra 10cm of groundsheet up the side wall before the taped seams, making it more water resistant. 

It has lots of internal pockets and a ‘fast-pack’ tent bag: a stuff sack with compression straps and an oversized opening. This is a nice touch, given how annoying it can be trying to squeeze tents back into tiny bags where every last millimetre of spare fabric has been removed.

Best one-person tents comparison table
One-person tentPriceWeightStyleBest use
Nemo Hornet$330 (US) / £285 (UK)905g / 2lbUltralight backpacking tent3 season use: fastpacking, thru hiking
Six Moon Lunar Solo$230 + $76 extras (US) / £240 (UK)862g / 1.9lbUltralight backpacking tent3 season use: fastpacking, thru hiking
MSR Carbon Reflex$523 (US) / £440 (UK)790g / 1.7lbUltralight backpacking tent3 season use: fastpacking, thru hiking
Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1£999 (UK)490g / 1lbUltralight backpacking tent3 season use: fastpacking, thru hiking
Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P£300 (UK)1.1kg / 2.4lbTrekking pole backpacking tent3-season use: fastpacking, thru hiking
Big Sky Chinook 1 Plus$400 (US) / £400 (UK)1.6kg / 3.5lbWinter backpacking tent4 season use: backpacking, thru hiking, winter camping
Exped Vela I Extreme$480 (US) / £450 (UK)1.9kg / 4.2lbBackpacking tent4 season use: backpacking, thru hiking, winter camping
Nordvisk Svalbard 1 Sl£290 (UK)1.7kg / 3.7lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking
Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P£470 (UK)1.25kg / 2.8lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking
Snugpak Ionosphere£194 (UK)1.6kg / 3.5lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking
Wild Country Coshee Micro V2£130 (UK)1.4kg / 3lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking
Robens Arrow Head£141 (UK) / €161 (EU)1.8kg / 4lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking
Vango F10 Helium UL 1£250 (UK)1.2kg / 2.6lbBackpacking tent3 season use: backpacking, thru hiking

How we test the best one-person tents

At Advnture we endeavor to test every product we feature extensively in the field. That means one of our team of reviewers and writers – all experienced outdoor specialists active across the US, UK, Europe and Australasia – taking it out into the terrain and climatic conditions that it’s designed for. If, for any reason, this isn’t possible, we’ll say so in our buying guides and reviews.

Our reviewers test one-person tents overnight, sleeping solo in outdoor conditions, temperatures and terrain appropriate to the rating assigned to the product by the manufacturers/ brand. They will also carry the tent in a backpacking scenario to test its performance as a shelter for multi day hikes.

For more details see how Advnture tests products.

Choosing the best one-person tent for you

There are hundreds of one-person tents available from an assortment of brands, all with very different designs, and it’s easy to get overwhelmed. 

If you're tackling Scotland's Munros in winter, you'll want a tent that is 4-season rated and can withstand blizzards and everything else the Highlands can (and will) throw at it. You might be wanting to get a taste for peak-bagging, taking on multiple summits under the summer sun. In which case, you'll need something lightweight, as you won't be quite as worried about your tent's ability to repel the apocalypse.

Make sure you consider the following before buying the best one-person tent for you:

Durability and robustness 

This comes in two parts. Firstly, how long will this tent last? Are you having a one-night stand, or will you be taking this tent camping for the next 20 years? Look for tents made of strong materials and with a high denier. Tied into this is how well your one-person tent will weather the elements. You want to make sure the tent is up to the conditions wherever you’ll be camping. No one wants to wake up in the middle of the night with their tent flattened by a storm. Strong poles are a must.

best one-person tent: Nemo Hornet

The Nemo Hornet is a robust tent, which should provide blessed shelter for many, many adventures (Image credit: Nemo)

Season rating

Just like sleeping bags, the best one-person tents have a season rating. It works very much the same way and will help you match up the right tent to the right weather conditions. A one- to two- season tent will have been designed for mild, warm and relatively dry conditions. It’ll be geared more towards keeping you cool and might leak in rain. A three-season tent will be ideal in conditions that include rainy and stormy weather. These tents are a bit more robust. Finally, a four-season tent is built for full-on winter camping and the conditions that come with it, designed to keep you warm in the snow and ice. 

If you're venturing out in winter, our how to choose a sleeping bag guide will also be of interest.

Dimensions

One-person tents tend to be minimalist. If you’re on the tall side, you want to make sure it’s long enough for you to lie down in. You don’t want to find out, at 11 o’clock on a stormy night, that your head is sticking out in the rain. It’s also worth giving the other dimensions a thought too: is it high enough to sit up in, or more of a glorified bivvy? Is there enough space for you and your kit, or is a bit of a squeeze? These questions are more relevant for multi-day expeditions, when you really appreciate that extra space.

If you want to go uber-minimalist, you might consider a bivvy. Our one-person tent vs bivvy bag feature delves into the pros and cons of either option.

Packability

Ultralight backpackers will typically want the best one-person tent that is as small and light as possible – within reason. The average is around the 1.5kg mark for a one-person tent, although it can go down to as little as 500g. The packed size is also important. You can pack the world’s lightest tent, but if it takes up your entire backpack that’s not much good. 

Construction

Each tent will have different construction features. Decide which ones are important to you and see how many you can get! For example, is it freestanding? If so, this is very useful on rocky ground that won’t take pegs, but not so necessary if you’re camping on grass. Can it be pitched inner and outer together for a hasty camp in the rain? Or can the outer be easily removed for hot summer nights? Consider too, little features like porch size, washing lines and pockets. It's infuriating if you've got the best camping tech but it has to stay buried in your backpack because there's nowhere in the tent's interior to keep it for quick, convenient access.

Nemo Hornet one-person tent

On hot, dry summer nights, it can be nice to have the option of just setting up the inner tent (Image credit: Nemo)

Australia-based Chris mastered his outdoor gear reviewing technique as an editor of outdoor and adventure magazines, including Walk (UK), Outer Edge and Trail Run Mag (Australia), and as a contributor to the likes of Australian Geographic Outdoor, Wild, Adventure NZ, and Lonely Planet adventure titles. He mostly knows what he's doing. Apart from that time he was helicoptered out of the Bhutanese Himalayas. Or evacuated from the Australian desert to hospital. Or... well, let's say he tests his gear with gusto.