The best one-person tents 2024: solo shelters for backcountry epics

Collage of the best one-person tents
(Image credit: Future)

The best one-person tents are compact and lightweight, making them ideal for lone adventurers looking to go as light as possible but in more comfort offered by a bivy sack. Our experts have tested a wide range of solo shelters on backcountry camping missions in their intended habitat, the mountains, pitting them against the elements to see which ones thrive.

The result is a 12-strong selection of the very best tents for those seeking wilderness adventures. Despite offering greater creature comforts and weather protection than a bivy, the best one-person tents still represent a relatively minimal approach to wild camping. They're often without the space, both internal and in terms of vestibules, than that offered by the best 2-person tents, many of which are also light enough to be suited to backpacking expeditions. So, before buying, consider exactly what it is that you value in a shelter to get the right balance between cost, space and weight for your adventures.

We reckon that the multi award-winning Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2 is the best one-person tent for general wild camping. However, all the tents in our selection have been chosen on merit, with some more suited to harsher, wintry conditions. Read on to find out more.

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The quick list

Here's our Quick List, starting with our top performer overall, followed by the rest of our roundup of the best one-person tents. For a more detailed look at these excellent shelters, navigate further down the guide.

The best one-person tents we recommend in 2024

You can trust Advnture Our expert reviewers spend days testing and comparing gear so you know how it will perform out in the real world. Find out more about how we test and compare products.

The best one-person tent overall

best one-person tent: Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2 backpacking tent

A multi-award-winning ultralight shelter that’s popular for a host of reasons  (Image credit: Craig Taylor)
The best lightweight one-person tent

Specifications

Weight: 1kg / 2lb 4oz
Pack Size: 15x50cm / 6 x 19.5in
Compatibility: Sleeps one comfortably or two at a push on good-weather backpacking and bikepacking adventures

Reasons to buy

+
Ultralight
+
Tiny pack size
+
Freestanding design
+
Comfortable and roomy
+
Multiple pitching options

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey for casual user
-
Susceptible to wind

The Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2 feels so ultralight initially that you'd be forgiven for thinking it wouldn't last a season. However, don't judge a book by its cover – this tent is seriously durable and able to cope with its fair share of wear and tear. Our expert tester Craig said that "the Fly Creek UL can put up with a surprising amount of abuse on the trail, as long as you treat it with a reasonable amount of care."

For a one-person tent, there's a decent amount of space too. It's got one door and a fair-sized vestibule, providing more than enough space for a solo adventurer and their kit. The vestibule is large enough to accommodate muddy boots and a sopping wet backpack or two. Some backpacking tents aren't large enough to properly sit up in, which makes them claustrophobic affairs – not so that Fly Creek UL, which has ample sitting space and enough room to move around freely in. Craig also goes on to say that it's "a doddle to erect and disassemble."

Read our full Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2 review

The best one-person tent for winter

best one-person tent: Nortent Vern 1 four-season tent

A very well-thought-out four-season shelter, the Nortent Vern 1 delivers impeccable performance in a huge range of conditions (Image credit: Craig Taylor)
The best one-person tent

Specifications

Packed weight: 1.7kgs / 3.7lbs
Pack size: Not stated
Dimensions: 328 x 200 x 100cm / 129 x 79 x 39in
Compatibility: 4-season all rounder

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight for a 4-season tent
+
Small pack size
+
Huge vestibule
+
Very roomy
+
Performs well in a range of conditions

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs to be seam sealed

"Impeccable performance in a huge range of conditions," according to our camping expert Craig, the Nortent Vern 1 in manufactured by a Norwegian brand that specialize in crafting shelters fit for the challenging conditions found in northern Scandinavia's Arctic uplands. The Vern series comprises the brand's compact and light four-season tents – there's both one-person and two-person options.

Considering we rate this as one of the best four-season tents, the Nortent Vern 1 is remarkably light, with a max weight of 1.7kg (3.7lbs). On top of this, it packs down smaller than most three-season tents too, which is hugely impressive. On test, we found pitching was straightforward and we were also impressed by the amount of vestibule space for cooking or storing sodden gear. 

It's worth bearing in mind that the tent's seams need to be sealed after purchase, though, this is relatively straightforward to achieve at home on a dry day with the included tube of sealant.

Read our full Nortent Vern 1 four-season tent review

The best value one-person winter tent

best one-person tent: Robens Starlight 1 four-season tent

A near bombproof one-person shelter, the Robens Starlight 1 offers some very impressive features (Image credit: Craig Taylor)
The best one-person tent for challenging winter conditions

Specifications

Packed weight: 2kg / 4.4lb
Pack size: 39cm x 15cm / 15in x 6in
Dimensions: 240 x 140 x 100cm / 94 x 55 x 39in
Compatibility: 4-season all rounder

Reasons to buy

+
Great in changing weather conditions
+
Very reliable and rugged
+
Reasonably priced
+
Highly waterproof
+
Excellent in strong winds

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the lightest
-
Very small interior
-
Small vestibule

From Danish camping experts Robens, the Starlight 1 is an impressively sturdy solo tunnel tent that's designed to perform even in difficult conditions. It's reputed to be able to withstand winds of up to 160kmph (94mph), making it "definitely one of the best four-season tents available today" according to our expert tester Craig.

He goes on to say that he's "owned the Robens Starlight 1 for a number of years now, and it’s become my go-to tent of choice." It's weight and packability makes it reasonably portable, while it's durability is top-class. Pitching is relatively straightforward and the multiple ventilation options are good too. Our main gripe is the lack of space on the inside and the small vestibule.

If you're after a do-anything shelter that's small and performs in pretty much all conditions, the Robens Starlight 1 is a solid option with some thoughtful features.

Read our full Robens Starlight 1 review

The best one-person tent for stretching out

best one-person tent: Six Moon Designs Skyscape Trekker 1P

Extremely spacious trekking pole tent that is also compact and lightweight, perfect for backpackers and thru hikers (Image credit: Matthew Jones)
Best one-person tent for stretching out

Specifications

Weight: 790g / 1lb 12oz
Pack Size: 38 x 13cm / 15 x 5in
Length: 305cm / 120in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Generous interior length
+
Stable, wind-shedding design
+
Roomy porch and large entrances
+
Lightweight, compact packed size

Reasons to avoid

-
Prone to condensation
-
Pegs/stakes not supplied
-
Seams need to be sealed before use

Our mountain camping expert Matthew insists that the Skyscape Trekker is "one of the most practical and effective options on the market." It weighs less than a kilo and its packed down size is so small it has to be seen to be believed. This all makes it a shoe-in for multi-day backpacking adventures.

It's a trekking pole tent with a hybrid designed that's based on a wedge-style single-skin pole shelter, though its hanging mesh and fabric inner provide some of the perks of a standard double-wall tent as well. It's easy to pitch and, once up, it's surprisingly roomy, benefitting from a spreader bar design that widens the headroom. It can also be pitched with carbon fiber struts, which are sold separately. 

All in all, this is a tent that offers fantastic liveability for numerous nights in the backcountry. If you're someone who's looking to go ultralight, it could be the tent for you, though beginner campers may be served better elsewhere.

Read our full Six Moon Designs Skyscape Trekker 1P review

The best one-person tent for vestibule space

best one-person tent: MSR FreeLite 1

This impressively light, yet surprisingly spacious, double-wall tent is a top choice for weight-conscious backpackers (Image credit: Matthew Jones)
Best one-person tent for porch area

Specifications

Weight: 880g / 1lb 15oz
Pack Size: 46cm x 10cm / 18 x 4in
Length: 221cm / 87in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Good headroom
+
Spacious porch area
+
Extremely lightweight

Reasons to avoid

-
Thin, delicate fabrics
-
Steep rear wall can catch the wind
-
Flysheet doesn’t offer the best all-round coverage

First impressions go a long way and our expert tester Matthew admitted that "it was hard not to be instantly impressed by the compact size and amazingly low weight of this tent when we first saw it packed away in its stuff sack." This is especially admirable considering the Freelite 1 is a double-skinned pole tent, rather than a more minimalist single-skin trekking pole tent. It's ideal for backcountry adventures where every gram matters.

With all of this in mind, we expected a relatively cramped interior but once we pitched it we found the opposite was true. The rectangular inner footprint provides decent length and width, while the headroom is superb. Importantly, the vestibule is also large enough to store muddy boots and wet gear.

As with most ultralight solo shelters, this is a tent designed for the milder months – we’d class it as a two-to-three season model. It’s also better suited to sheltered camp spots rather than exposed hillsides, since one side of the tent has a steep wall that can catch the wind. Matthew advises: "just be sensible about where you pitch it and you’ll be fine."

Read our full MSR FreeLite 1 review

The best ultralight one-person tent

Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1 one-person tent

An extremely lightweight tent for when every gram matters (Image credit: Terra Nova)

6. Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1

The best ultralight one-person tent

Specifications

Weight: 0.49kg/1lb 1.28oz
Pack size: 30 x 9cm/11.8 x 3.5in
Dimensions: 220 x 81cm/86.6x31.9in
Compatibility: 3-season lightweight adventures

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely lightweight
+
You can sit up inside the tent
+
Small pack size

Reasons to avoid

-
Not freestanding
-
Very expensive

Terra Nova markets the Laser Pulse Ultra 1 as the ‘lightest tent in the world’. At only 450g minimum weight (490g when you pack it as intended) it’s perfect for people who know their bag weight to the nearest 0.1g. Or for people who like bragging about ultralight gear at parties. 

The tent is aimed at the multiday mountain marathon runner - the type of person who wants to keep weight to the absolute minimum, but can suffer a little for the sake of a couple of nights on the hill. The shelter has a tunnel construction, which we found gave enough height to allow an adult to sit up inside. A groundsheet protector is available separately. And if you’re worried about wear and tear, Terra Nova offers a guarantee ‘to the original owner against defects in materials and workmanship for the lifetime of the product’.

The best trekking pole tent

best one-person tent: Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P

An unusual trekking pole tent that balances weight, size and liveability  (Image credit: Matthew Jones)
Best trekking pole tent

Specifications

Weight: 1.08kg / 3lb 7oz
Pack size: 40 x 16cm / 16 x 6.5in
Length: 259cm / 102in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Good internal length and headroom
+
Useful porch areas
+
Can be pitched inner first, all-in-one or outer first
+
Lightweight, compact packed size

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs careful pitching
-
Inner is not the widest

This innovative, double-walled shelter uses trekking poles placed at opposite corners to form its structure. It creates an offset, slightly odd look that, despite appearances, is very effective. "We grew to appreciate the ingenuity of the design," stated our expert tester Matthew. It provides more interior headroom than similar tents in this guide.

This 3000 version is the result of evolution from the original High Route. It's a more robust beast, with heavier and more rugged fabrics that boast a 3,000mm Hydrostatic Head, hence the 3000 in the name. This means greater protection from the rain and greater interior warmth.

There's also a huge degree of versatility, as it can be pitched outer first, all-in-one or just as the inner on dry days. While the inner isn't the widest around, there's still room to stretch or sit upright, a quality not present in all one-person tents. The design provides two vestibule spaces, one that's accessible via a half-zip that Sierra Designs has named the 'gear garage' and the other at the main entrance.

Read our full Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P review

The best one-person tent for challenging weather

Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P one-person tent

A spacious and sturdy tent to withstand the worst weather (Image credit: Vaude)

8. Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P

Best one-person tent for challenging conditions

Specifications

Weight: 1.25kg/2lb 12oz
Pack size: 40 x 12 cm/15.75 x 4.7in
Dimensions: 2.3msq
Compatibility: 3-season trekking

Reasons to buy

+
Spacious
+
Easy to pitch
+
High wind stability
+
Eco friendly construction

Reasons to avoid

-
Not 100% freestanding

The Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P tent is a popular choice for bad-weather camping. If you are expecting to be throwing your tent up in the dark, amid horizontal rain, then this might be the tent for you. The Hogan has a very simple two pole ‘tri-pod’ construction that we found was incredibly simple to pitch and very sturdy against high winds. 

However, it relies on the tent corners being pegged out for maximum space so this is not a completely freestanding tent. You will not be able to use the tent to full capacity on hard or rocky ground. It can either be a spacious one-person tent or a cosy two-person tent, designed specifically for the lightweight market. It has adjustable ventilation and is completely PVC-free, manufactured with the environment in mind.

The best value one-person tent for summer

best one-person tent: Alpkit Soloist 1-person 3-season tent

A compact, well-designed, lightweight 1-person tent – the perfect shelter for backpacking escapades throughout most of the year (Image credit: Pat Kinsella)
Best budget one-person tent

Specifications

Weight: Regular: 1,200g / 2lb 10oz; X-Large: 1,318g / 2lb 14.5oz
Pack size: Regular: 42 x 12cm / 16.5 x 4.7in; X-Large: 44 x 13cm / 17.3 x 5.1in
Dimensions: Regular: 200 x 95cm / 79 x 37in; X-Large 220 x 95cm / 87 x 37in
Compatibility: 3-season adventures

Reasons to buy

+
Small pack size
+
Quick and easy to pitch
+
Discreet colour
+
Great value for such a quality shelter

Reasons to avoid

-
Not enough interior pockets
-
The mesh door lowers the internal temperature and rules the Soloist out as a 4-season shelter
-
Zips occasionally catch

Available at an excellent price, the Soloist is the ideal tent for solo backpackers looking to venture out in all but the depths of bleakest midwinter.

It features a semi-geodesic design that's easy to erect and take down. One of the key components of the wild camping code we should all try to follow is discreet camping, which this tent's color allows when pitching in grassy terrain. There's plenty of space inside the Soloist for one person plus a reasonable amount of gear, thanks to the tapered shape. "No matter how much gear I’ve lugged along for the various trips I’ve taken this tent on, the Soloist has swallowed the lot," said our expert tester Pat.

At 95cm tall, the interior gives plenty of space to sit up and move around, while the 2-meter length is long enough for most to lie back, though taller campers may want to look at the extra large version. In terms of vestibule space, there's enough for wet gear and the like, though not quite enough to fire up the camping stove when it's pouring outside.

Read our full Alpkit Soloist one-person tent review

The best low-profile one-person tent

best one-person tent: Snugpak Ionosphere

Low-profile solo tent that works well for stealthy wild camps (Image credit: Matthew Jones)
Best low-profile one-person tent

Specifications

Weight: 1.55kg / 3lb 7oz
Pack size: 48cm x 14cm / 19 x 6in
Length: 265cm / 104in
Compatibility: 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Good interior length and width
+
Stable, wind-shedding design
+
Well-priced for a tent of this quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor headroom
-
No porch or vestibule area

Campers who desire headroom and space to move around won't be enamored with the Ionosphere, but those who value the inconspicuous nature of a wind-shedding low profile will approve. The design of this tent, from British brand Snugpak, is halfway between a hooped bivy and a standard one-person tent, making it one of the most minimal offerings in this guide. So, it's a little bit cramped in terms of height, though its length and width are both exceedingly generous.

"This makes it a practical choice for stealthy wild camps just off the trail or exposed pitches on hill, moor and mountain," according to our expert tester Matthew. Featuring inner-first pitching, it's easy to set up, while the double-walled design provides plenty of protection. The inner can also be pitched individually, providing a stand-alone bug shelter in warmer weather.

It's width means that there's room for your kit and rucksack next to your sleeping area, though there's no vestibule, which means storing your wet gear inside. Two mesh pockets provide useful quick-access storage too.

Read our full Snugpak Ionosphere review

The best one-person tent for ease of pitch

Wild Country Coshee Micro V2 one-person tent

A great starter tent for an affordable first foray into solo camping (Image credit: Wild Country)

11. Wild Country Coshee Micro V2

Best for budget and ease of pitch

Specifications

Weight: 1.4kg/ 3lb 1oz
Pack size: 36 x 14cm/14.2 x 5.5in
Dimensions: 215 x 56cm/84.6 x 22in
Compatibility: 2-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Quick and easy to pitch
+
Excellent value for a tent of this quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Small interior
-
Not freestanding
-
Very low profile

Designed and priced to be more accessible to mainstream campers and backpackers, the Wild Country Coshee Micro V2 is an affordable option for people just starting to explore one-person tents. This would be a great place to start if you’re not sure exactly what you want in terms of features. 

It is a small tunnel-type tent, with only two poles. We were unable to sit up inside it, which wasn't a surprise considering it's described as a ‘deluxe bivvy’ by the manufacturer. Porch space is limited, but the full-length door enables you to make the most of what there is. If you’re happy to slide into a small abode at the end of a long day, this is well worth a look.

The best entry level one-person tent

best one-person tents: Robens Arrow Head

A great value entry-level tent that is robust, stable and protective, if fractionally heavy for a solo shelter  (Image credit: Matthew Jones)
Best entry-level one-person tent for general camping

Specifications

Weight: 1.8kg / 3lb 15oz
Pack Size: 38cm x 15cm / 15 x 6in
Length: 270cm / 106in
Compatibility: : 3-season backpacking

Reasons to buy

+
Competitively priced
+
Can be pitched outer first or all-in-one
+
Compact packed size

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the lightest
-
Limited headroom
-
Small porch/vestibule

"Extremely well-priced," says our expert reviewer Matthew. Yes, this robust and stable shelter is perfect for backpackers on a budget. Yet, despite the low price, we found that the Arrow Head is well designed and, with its rugged 75-denier poyester fly sheet and quality aluminium pole set, makes for a durable little product.

There's versatility too, as it can be pitched outer first, as an all-in-one or just as an inner tent for warm, dry days. As is often the case with the more budget options, it's a little heavier than some of the premium tents in our roundup, though the packed size is pretty good. The bottom line is, if you want to save grams, you’ll have to spend a bit more. Fortunately, this tent still stows easily in a backpacking rucksack.

Read our full Robens Arrow Head review

The best one-person tent comparison table

Swipe to scroll horizontally
One-person tentPriceWeightStyle
Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2$399 (US) / £374.99 (UK)1kg / 2lb 4ozUltralight backpacking tent
Nortent Vern 1 four-season tent$526 (US) / £406 (UK)1.7kgs / 3.7lbs4-season backpacking tent
Robens Starlight 1$180 (US) / £256 (UK)2kg / 4.4lb4-season backpacking tent
Six Moon Designs Skyscape Trekker 1P$270 (US) / £285 (UK)790g / 1lb 12ozUltralight backpacking tent
MSR FreeLite 1$370 (US) / £395 (UK)880g / 1lb 15ozUltralight backpacking tent
Terra Nova Laser Pulse Ultra 1£999 (UK)490g / 1lbUltralight backpacking tent
Sierra Designs High Route 3,000 1P£300 (UK)1.1kg / 2.4lbTrekking pole backpacking tent
Vaude Hogan SUL 1-2P£470 (UK)1.25kg / 2.8lbBackpacking tent
Alpkit Soloist£139.99 (UK)1.2kg / 2.10lbBackpacking tent
Snugpak Ionosphere£194 (UK)1.6kg / 3.5lbBackpacking tent
Wild Country Coshee Micro V2£130 (UK)1.4kg / 3lbBackpacking tent
Robens Arrow Head£141 (UK) / €161 (EU)1.8kg / 4lbBackpacking tent

Meet the testers

best one-person tents: Matt Jones
Matthew Jones

Matt has been camping for as long as he can remember. He has a particular fondness for wild camping trips, especially in Wales' spectacular Eryri (Snowdonia) National Park, where he lives. He's tested many solo shelters in his time and loves disappearing into the mountains with nothing but his camping gear for a lightweight, overnight adventure.

Pat Kinsella
Pat Kinsella

Pat's outdoor adventures have taken him across the world and, wherever he goes, he's usually got a tent in his backpack. These days, when he's not solo camping in the hills, he enjoys camping trips with his family. An experienced gear tester, he leaves no stone unturned and no peg unexamined when it comes to judging outdoor kit.

best one-person tents: Craig Taylor
Craig Talyor

Growing up just south of the glorious Brecon Beacons National Park, Craig spent his childhood living in the hills. As he got older, the hills got bigger, and his passion for spending quality time in the great outdoors only grew - falling in love with wild camping. Having recently returned to the UK after almost a decade in Germany, he now focuses on regular camping adventures in nearby Snowdonia and the Brecon Beacons.

How we test the best one-person tents

At Advnture we endeavor to test every product we feature extensively in the field. That means one of our team of reviewers and writers – all experienced outdoor specialists active across the US, UK, Europe and Australasia – taking it out into the terrain and climatic conditions that it’s designed for. If, for any reason, this isn’t possible, we’ll say so in our buying guides and reviews.

Our reviewers test one-person tents overnight, sleeping solo in outdoor conditions, temperatures and terrain appropriate to the rating assigned to the product by the manufacturers/ brand. They will also carry the tent in a backpacking scenario to test its performance as a shelter for multi day hikes.

For more details see how Advnture tests products.

How to choose the best one-person tent

There are hundreds of one-person tents available from an assortment of brands, all with very different designs, and it’s easy to get overwhelmed. 

Our camping expert Matthew advises that "if you're tackling mountains in winter, you'll want a tent that is 4-season rated and can withstand blizzards and everything else the alpine can (and will) throw at it." However, you might be wanting to get a taste for peak-bagging, taking on multiple summits under the summer sun. In which case, you'll need something lightweight, as you won't be quite as worried about your tent's ability to repel the apocalypse.

We've compiled a FAQs and other aspects to consider before buying the best one-person tent for your adventures:

best one-person tent: wild camping in the MSR FreeLite 1

The MSR FreeLite 1 is a superb lightweight option (Image credit: Matthew Jones)

How long should a one-person tent last?

This comes in two parts. Firstly, how long will this tent last? Are you having a one-night stand, or will you be taking this tent camping for the next 20 years? Look for tents made of strong materials and with a high denier. Tied into this is how well your one-person tent will weather the elements. You want to make sure the tent is up to the conditions wherever you’ll be camping. No one wants to wake up in the middle of the night with their tent flattened by a storm. Strong poles are a must.

best one-person tent: Nemo Hornet

The Nemo Hornet is a robust tent, which should provide blessed shelter for many, many adventures (Image credit: Nemo)

What is a 3-season tent?

Just like sleeping bags, the best one-person tents have a season rating. It works very much the same way and will help you match up the right tent to the right weather conditions. A one- to two- season tent will have been designed for mild, warm and relatively dry conditions. It’ll be geared more towards keeping you cool and might leak in rain. A three-season tent will be ideal in conditions that include rainy and stormy weather. These tents are a bit more robust. Finally, a four-season tent is built for full-on winter camping and the conditions that come with it, designed to keep you warm in the snow and ice. 

If you're venturing out in winter, our how to choose a sleeping bag guide will also be of interest.

How big should a one person tent be?

One-person tents tend to be minimalist. If you’re on the tall side, you want to make sure it’s long enough for you to lie down in. You don’t want to find out, at 11 o’clock on a stormy night, that your head is sticking out in the rain. It’s also worth giving the other dimensions a thought too: is it high enough to sit up in, or more of a glorified bivvy? Is there enough space for you and your kit, or is a bit of a squeeze? These questions are more relevant for multi-day expeditions, when you really appreciate that extra space.

If you want to go uber-minimalist, you might consider a bivvy. Our one-person tent vs bivvy bag feature delves into the pros and cons of either option.

best one-person tent: camping in Snowdonia in MSR FreeLite 1

A wonderful summer wild camp in MSR's FreeLite 1 (Image credit: Matthew Jones)

How heavy is too heavy for a one-person tent?

When lugging all your camping gear up a hill, the lighter it is, the better. However, too light and it may not afford the protection you need against the mountain elements.

In this guide, the ultralight 3-season tents range from around 500g to 1kg. These tents are generally constructed from cutting edge materials and are more expensive. They're also generally unsuited to winter use.

Between 1kg and 1.5kg is fairly normal for a standard one-person tent and won't weigh you down too much on the trail. A decent one-person winter tent will weigh more towards 2kg and will give you all the protection you need against gnarly conditions.

Above 2kg and you'll start to feel it on those long ascents. It might be worth spending more on something lighter.

Is packability important?

Ultralight backpackers will typically want the best one-person tent that is as small and light as possible – within reason. As well as the weight, the packed size is also important. You can pack the world’s lightest tent, but if it takes up your entire backpack that’s not much good. 

What construction features should I consider?

Each tent will have different construction features. Decide which ones are important to you and see how many you can get! For example, is it freestanding? If so, this is very useful on rocky ground that won’t take pegs, but not so necessary if you’re camping on grass. Can it be pitched inner and outer together for a hasty camp in the rain? Or can the outer be easily removed for hot summer nights? Consider too, little features like porch size, washing lines and pockets. It's infuriating if you've got the best camping tech but it has to stay buried in your backpack because there's nowhere in the tent's interior to keep it for quick, convenient access.

Matthew Jones

An outdoors writer and editor, Matt Jones has been testing kit in the field for nearly a decade. Having worked for both the Ramblers and the Scouts, he knows one or two things about walking and camping, and loves all things adventure, particularly long-distance backpacking, wild camping and climbing mountains – especially in Wales. He’s based in Snowdonia and last year thru-hiked the Cambrian Way, which runs for 298 miles from Cardiff to Conwy, with a total ascent of 73,700 feet – that’s nearly 2½ times the height of Everest. Follow Matt on Instagram and Twitter.